Capt Bill’s Theory of Relativity

According to an article in The Atlantic that a friend sent me about the rotation of the earth and the apparent tilt of the planet (relative to what, since we are in outer space, or in our particular chunk of the galaxy, and where up or down are is not exactly explainable, especially since we are constantly spinning but not getting dizzy or falling off, although at times we are upside up or upside down?) we are moving at a speed of 66,628.8 linear miles per hour.

To explain that this is much faster than most things we are familiar with on earth, the only place most of us are truly familiar with, would be didactic and a colossal waste of time simultaneously, particularly considering the speed all of us are traveling at.  Just a brief thought at this juncture–is a F1 driver traveling at a steady 200 mph according to his car’s speedometer, traveling at 66,828.8 mph if he is traveling in the same direction as the planet when the track is facing that direction, and is he traveling at 66,428.8 mph when he goes the other way, and what is even more perplexing, What is the other way if on an oval track?  Then too, what about the curves–the parts of the track that bend around and lead to the straight road in the opposite direction.  Are we traveling around these curves at the speed of 66,628.8, 66,428.8, or 66,828.8 mph?  Even MORE puzzling, why can our bodies, challenged when a jet plane flies at a pokey 2,000 mph by the immense g-forces when stopping, turning, diving, or climbing, withstand the g-forces of 66,628.8 mph?  

Now I understand why Albert Einstein coined the term, “Theory of Relativity”.  He did it for the same reason that Jackson Pollack called No. 6, “No. 6”–because he could.

Therefore, as I set out on my journey to the freshly made sheets of our bed, I will assert my privileges as Captain, retired, because I can and will unequivocally state that the speed is relative to our position on the planet which is in itself relative to it’s position in space and to the great gravitational  magnet of our everlasting light source–the sun.  In future postings I may choose to offer a formula for the theory, or maybe not.  I don’t think anyone cares at this point in the journey.

Comments to this post are futile.  I don’t understand any of it other than the fact that it is all relative.

Naptime!

Bill

Here’s the link that started all this: http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2013/12/the-astronomical-hijinks-of-the-shortest-day-of-the-year/282109/

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